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Events allows growers to swap, sell their plants

Posted: October 15, 2011 - 12:00am  |  Updated: October 16, 2011 - 12:06am
Helene Hondrum, an organizer of the Savannah Rapids Pavilion Plant Swap, displays plants the Cherokee Rose Garden Club has already collected.   Jim Blaylock / Staff
Jim Blaylock / Staff
Helene Hondrum, an organizer of the Savannah Rapids Pavilion Plant Swap, displays plants the Cherokee Rose Garden Club has already collected.

Members of the Cherokee Rose Garden Club recently learned more about dividing and propagating perennials. The information came just in time for the club's annually sponsored plant swap and sale.

The annual swap and sale is held each fall, weather permitting, in the parking lot of Savannah Rapids Pavilion. This year's sale was moved to October because fall is a great time to plant shrubs, trees and perennials, said Cherokee Rose Garden Club member Betsy Ristroph. The swap and sale will be held from 9 a.m. until noon Saturday.

"Plants have time over our mild winter to settle in before the heat of next summer," said Ristroph. "A plant swap is an excellent place to obtain what we call ‘pass along' plants - those that multiply vigorously and need to be thinned often."

Anyone who wants to set up a table to either swap or sale their plants is invited to do so. Plants and other garden-related items, such as tools, pots and garden art, will be available for those who wish to swap and shop.

The event is free and there is no setup or parking fee.

Individuals wishing to divide their plants for the sale can do so a number of ways, said Ristroph. Some methods take longer than others. There are generally three ways to propagate perennials:

 

  • Separate a plant by dividing or cutting or potting up runners. This is typically reserved for daylilies, irises and ferns.
  • To propagate woody stemmed plants, bury the stem in the soil while it is still attached to the mother plant and by spring the new plant will be ready to survive on its own. This is particularly useful for hydrangeas.
  • Ripe seeds and plants can be saved to sprout new plants. However, Ristroph said this method of propagating takes the longest if the desire is to end up with large plants.

 

For information about the plant sale and swap, call event chairs Helene Hondrum at (706) 854-8215 or Betty Crowther at (706) 825-8613.

All participants must bring their own tables and display equipment.

 

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