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First responders teach fire safety, escape at camp

Posted: July 3, 2017 - 3:52pm
Robert Eastman with the Grovetown Department of Public Safety quizzes students on fire safety in the Liberty Park Community Center gymnasium, before taking turns running a drill on how to exit a house in the event of a fire. The event is part of a weeklong summer camp by the department, lead by Eastman.  Abbigail Lennon
Abbigail Lennon
Robert Eastman with the Grovetown Department of Public Safety quizzes students on fire safety in the Liberty Park Community Center gymnasium, before taking turns running a drill on how to exit a house in the event of a fire. The event is part of a weeklong summer camp by the department, lead by Eastman.

The Grovetown Public Safety Department held its annual summer camp last week.

On Thursday, campers learned about fire safety and what to do if a fire occurs by going through the Fire Safety House that simulates a fire in the home.

"Kids your age have saved their parents lives and their siblings lives because they knew what to do," said Robert Eastman with the Grovetown Public Safety Deparment.

Eastman, who leads the camp each year, engaged the group of campers in questions like "What do you do if your clothes catch on fire?"

Eastman explained the process step by step, from the time children hear a drill and are to yell "Fire! Fire! Fire!" to when it's safe for them to return to the home.
Eastman took groups of five at a time into the department's Fire Safety House, which emits fake smoke and enables children to complete the proper responses to a house fire.

The drill began "upstairs" when the fake smoke, made of mostly fog, filled the air and the fake fire alarm rang out. As instructed the children shouted "Fire! Fire! Fire!"

Then one at a time, the children crawled to the top of the stairs, and scooted down, before crawling on their hands and knees to exit the house. The children then ran to the safety zone, which was a mailbox set up back inside the Liberty Park Community Center gym. The mailbox, Eastman explained, signified the neighbor's mailbox, which was where campers were instructed to go to in the event their home caught on fire.

The campers wrapped up the week Friday with a presentation on ecology and a hands-on look at local wildlife from research professionals with Savannah River Site.

 

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